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ICC President David Morgan visits Bradman Museum in Bowral

In the year of the ICC’s centenary, President David Morgan used some of his time in Australia for the recently-concluded ICC Women’s World Cup to pay a visit to a location synonymous with the game’s rich history.

ICC President David Morgan visits Bradman Museum in Bowral - Cricket News
Mr Morgan and his wife Ann visited Bowral, a town two hours’ drive south-west of Sydney where the game’s greatest batsman, Sir Donald Bradman, grew up and where, now, the Bradman Museum is located.

“Recognising and respecting cricket’s heritage is a key part of the ICC’s centenary – and the Bradman Foundation is a living example of people doing exactly that”

ICC launching centenary medal in Wellington New Zealand later this week to honour volunteers who keep cricket ticking


In the year of the ICC’s centenary, President David Morgan used some of his time in Australia for the recently-concluded ICC Women’s World Cup to pay a visit to a location synonymous with the game’s rich history.

Mr Morgan and his wife Ann visited Bowral, a town two hours’ drive south-west of Sydney where the game’s greatest batsman, Sir Donald Bradman, grew up and where, now, the Bradman Museum is located.

Mr Morgan met with directors of the Bradman Foundation, including its Chairman Michael Ball, the former Australia Prime Minister John Howard, Dr Peta Seaton and Ms Rina Hore.

And afterwards he said: “One of the key things the ICC is seeking to do during its centenary year is to promote recognition of and respect for cricket’s heritage.

“We are doing that alongside FICA (the Federation of International Cricketers’ Associations) through the development of the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame* and what is happening in Bowral is another living example of people promoting and protecting the game’s unique spirit.

“The Bradman Foundation is ensuring the name of Sir Donald Bradman, easily the greatest batsman to have played our great game, lives on through the Bradman Museum and the Bradman Oval.

“I met with some of the Foundation’s directors, they told me of their plans for their Museum and I left extremely impressed with what I heard, as well as heartened that people care so passionately about the past and the future.

“The ICC will always seek to do all it can to assist organisations and groups that promote a greater awareness and understanding of the game’s history and, having established this link to the Bradman Foundation, I look forward to staying in touch with it in the future.”

Chairman of the Bradman Foundation Michael Hall said: “The Bradman Foundation and the ICC have much in common: we are both not-for-profit groups dedicated to the playing, teaching and appreciation of cricket.

“We are grateful for David and Ann taking the time to visit the Bradman Museum and we look forward to finding ways in which the Bradman Foundation and the ICC can cooperate in the future.”

Mr Morgan added his meeting at the Bradman Oval, which staged two matches during the ICC Women’s World Cup, highlighted another aspect of what the ICC’s centenary year is all about.

“All the Foundation’s directors are volunteers and during 2009 we intend to shine a light on the countless unsung heroes across the globe that work for the benefit of the sport,” he said.

“Later this week in Wellington, New Zealand, we will be launching the ICC centenary medal, 1000 of which will be presented to volunteers around the world as a recognition of their efforts.

“Whether they are fixtures secretaries, part-time curators, umpires and scorers who give up their time to ensure the smooth running of any match or even those people who prepare meals for the players and officials, they are the people who keep cricket ticking.

“They are an integral part of our great sport with a great spirit and I look forward to honouring them over the coming months as our centenary celebrations continue,” he added.

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