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ICC releases results of drug testing in the first quarter of 2014

Widespread testing programme incorporated 238 urine tests, including a record 135 tests at the ICC World Twenty20 Bangladesh 2014

ICC releases results of drug testing in the first quarter of 2014 - Cricket News
David Richardson said that the ICC would continue its zero tolerance approach towards doping in cricket.
The International Cricket Council (ICC) today released the results of drug testing that it conducted in the first quarter of 2014, which featured the ICC Cricket World Cup Qualifier New Zealand 2014, the ICC U19 Cricket World Cup UAE 2014 and the ICC World Twenty20 Bangladesh 2014, as well as a number of high profile bilateral international series.

The widespread testing programme incorporated 238 urine tests, including a record 135 tests at the ICC World Twenty20 Bangladesh 2014, a 51 per cent increase in the number of tests conducted at the previous event in Sri Lanka.

The testing programme was administered across 31 teams, (10 Full Members (men’s and women’s) and 11 Associate and Affiliate Members), and incorporated in-competition and out-of-competition testing on both men’s and women’s teams. The ICC is pleased to report that none of the samples collected resulted in Adverse Analytical Findings.

The ICC also delivered interactive anti-doping education sessions to over 250 cricketers and support personnel at the ICC U19 Cricket World Cup UAE 2014, recognising the importance of education as a vital element in the broader fight against doping in sport, and it remains committed to supporting its Member Boards in drug awareness and education.

ICC Chief Executive David Richardson said: “The ICC has a zero tolerance approach to doping in cricket and remains committed to ensuring cricket remains a drug free sport. The figures clearly indicate that the ICC has an extensive testing programme and that both the ICC and its Members have been proactive in creating awareness and educating players on anti-doping issues.”

“Whilst we are confident that the sport of cricket remains free from doping, we are not complacent about such risks and we remain vigilant and have plans to further develop the programme in the coming months.”

It is now eight years since the ICC became a signatory to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Code in 2006. Since then, in addition to testing at ICC events, the ICC has introduced in-competition testing at bi-lateral international series and out-of-competition testing on both men’s and women’s teams. ICC testing numbers have increased five-fold since 2007, with only two tests resulting in Anti-Doping Rule Violations, both in 2011 and both in respect of substances provided to players by medical support personnel for the treatment of injuries.

The ICC also introduced its whereabouts program in 2009, consisting of the International Registered Testing Pool (IRTP) and the National Player Pool (NPP) to facilitate effective out-of-competition testing. The ICC anti-doping programme has developed significantly over the past eight years and will continue to do so, to ensure cricket plays its part in the global fight against doping in sport. More details about the ICC Anti-Doping Programme can be found here.

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